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UA News for Dec. 21, 2022

Happy Solstice! With the university system closing for the holidays, this will be the last news report until the new year. Happy holidays to all!


In today's news: the UAS applied fisheries program prepares students for jobs in the fishing industry; the war in Ukraine has interrupted permafrost research in Russia, with US and European researchers unable to travel there, and Russian scientists unable to continue to collaborate with other researchers; and Nanook sports coverage includes hockey and men's basketball.


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3 Articles
Wrangell Sentinel
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UAS program prepares students for jobs in fishing industry

Published Dec 21, 2022 by Wrangell Sentinel

Everything you could possibly want to know about fish, from their biological characteristics to the commercial fisheries that harvest and sell them to the governmental entities that regulate them, is available through the University of Alaska Southeast applied fisheries program. Catering to high schoolers, recent graduates and seasoned professionals alike, the school’s online and in-person programs prepare students for jobs in the industry.


Applied fisheries is a workforce development program housed in the UAS career education department in Sitka. 


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theworld.org
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Critical permafrost research in Russia disrupted by war in Ukraine

Published Dec 20, 2022 by Levi Bridges

For decades, scientists from the US and Europe traveled to faraway parts of Russia, like Yakutia, each year to launch new permafrost research in collaboration with Russian scientists.


But since the war started last February, many Western universities and research institutions have stopped funding permafrost research in Russia. A combination of moral opposition to the war, fear that foreign researchers might face safety issues while traveling in Russia, and the practical impossibility of funding research projects in the face of sanctions that make it impossible to transfer money, have all played into the decisions.


Russian scientists have also been banned from attending some scientific conferences.


Current permafrost research now focuses heavily on Alaska and Canada. 


“I’m very sad, the world is losing a great opportunity for exchange between the international research community,” said Alexander Kholodov, a permafrost researcher at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, who has been restricted from visiting his research sites in Russia.


In the past, Kholodov and other researchers helped their Russian colleagues by bringing scientific equipment to Russia that was either not available in the country or too expensive.


Meanwhile, foreign researchers doing fieldwork in places like Siberia benefited immensely from Russian scientists’ local knowledge. Russia has a deep tradition of permafrost research dating back well into the Soviet era.


“Historically, in terms of permafrost science, Russia is one of the pioneers,” Kholodov said. 


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KTVF (NBC)
Fairbanks Evening News

Published Dec 20, 2022 by KTVF

The Alaska Nanooks will celebrate their twelfth straight Alaska Airlines Governor's Cup win Saturday, January 28th in the sixth and final meeting of the season.


Earlier today, I caught up with coach Largen on winning the alaskan rivalry for another year....


Following the Nanooks men's basketball's historic game against Portland Bible College, they finished their non-conference schedule with another game against Portland Bible College. The game was pretty much a wrap after the first half, as the Nanooks built a 43 point lead at the break. Nanooks hit triple digits, winning 104-43.

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