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UA News for February 21, 2023

In today's news: UA President Pat Pitney to deliver the State of the University Address today; UAA women's basketball still has a chance at the postseason; and new research demonstrates how neighborly cooperation can increase chances of survival.


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University of Alaska President Pitney to deliver “State of the University” address

Published Feb 21, 2023

Pitney will deliver the address at 12 noon tomorrow at the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel’s Gold Room. The luncheon begins at 12 p.m., and the 25-minute address will commence after opening comments, introductions, and regular Chamber business. The event will be streamed live at alaska.edu/pres/sou.


The address will focus on how the University empowers Alaska, and highlight excellence across the UA System. President Pitney will also spotlight the role UA’s world-class research plays in driving the future.


This will be President Pitney’s third State of the University address since being appointed in 2020 as interim president, and her second as the university system’s 17th president.


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Anchorage Daily News
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UAA women’s basketball is ‘peaking at the right time’ following blowout win in home finale

Published Feb 21, 2023 by Josh Reed

Both of the University of Alaska Anchorage basketball teams entered their final week of home games for the 2022-2023 season in similar situations with the same goal in mind — to earn wins that would keep their postseason hopes alive.


While the men’s team faltered and lost its final two games of the year at the Alaska Airlines Center on Thursday and Saturday, the women’s team got back on track.


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Phys.org
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Neighborly cooperation can ensure your genes survive, new research finds

Published Feb 20, 2023 by Science X

Professor Robinson worked with colleagues Dr. António Rodrigues from Yale University and Dr. Jessica Barker from Aarhus University and the University of Alaska Anchorage to try and explain how this level of cooperation could come about and what benefits it might offer to those involved.


They developed the following hypothesis. Firstly, plentiful food means that the group gets bigger but also reduces conflict between its members. When offspring move away to establish satellite groups they don't move far, in order to remain close to food sources. Kinship and plentiful resources results in little conflict between these different, but related, groups, and makes it in their interest to prevent new groups getting settled nearby. Finally sharing of resources ensures that all the cooperating groups thrive.


To test this hypothesis, Dr. Rodrigues created a model that can mathematically quantify the evolutionary consequences of different levels of cooperation. The model allows the researchers to change a number of variables—such as how far offspring move from the parent group—to see how this affects the outcome.


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